This block type should be used in "unccd one column" section with "Full width" option enabled

Best practices in sustainable land management

Land Management and Restoration Header Image

Examples from the SPI report

In 2017, UNCCD’s Science Policy Interface (SPI) published a report  showcasing several dozen examples of individual sustainable land management (SLM) best practices selected from scientific journal articles, research papers and SLM databases (including WOCAT). This information is categorised by land use type and technology group. 

The WOCAT global database on SLM

The WOCAT database is one of the largest SLM global databases. The database contains more than 2,180 SLM practices from 130 countries, in twelve different languages, including best practices reported by UNCCD Parties. 

Best practice examples
Using organic fertilizers

Organic fertilizer is applied to the fields to enhance productivity by increasing the level of organic matter in the soil (humus), which stimulates soil biological activity and improves soil structure, water infiltration and retention, and nutrient storage. The most commonly used organic fertilizers include compost using straw pen manure with litter or household waste. Farming advisors provide farmers with training on techniques on preparing and applying the different types of organic fertilizer. Basic equipment (cart, wheelbarrow) is used to transport the organic matter. Preparation and maintenance of the composting and slurry pits and application of fertilizer on the fields are managed by the farmers.

Integrated soil fertility management
Cropland
Using organic fertilizers
Biochar application as a soil amendment

Application of fine-grained charcoal as an amendment to improve soil quality and mitigate greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from croplands. As a soil amendment, biochar can favour long-term stabilisation of carbon stocks, serving as a net withdrawal of atmospheric carbon dioxide. From an agronomic point of view, high organic carbon input from biochar can enhance the nutrient and water retention capacity of the amended soil, reducing the total fertilizer requirements.

Integrated soil fertility management
Cropland
Biochar application as a soil amendment
Production and application of bio-humus

The technology makes use of red worms to process fresh manure filled into a trench to improve soil fertility. To process the manure, a trench is prepared and filled with fresh manure and 5 kg of worms, which feed on the manure and process it. Within 20-25 days bio-humus is produced and then separated from the worms by using a metal mesh, and the activity can be repeated anew. The produced bio-humus is used as an organic fertilizer for vegetable production. Application norms are 2.5-5 tons of bio-humus per hectare.

Integrated soil fertility management
Cropland
Production and application of bio-humus
Planting pits for soil fertilisation and moisture improvement

Planting pits are filled with organic vegetative material mixed with decomposing manure to create a reservoir of nutrients for a banana plantation. Each pit is dug close to a banana stand and is filled with chopped banana stems, a layer of manure covered with mulch to prevent excessive evaporation of moisture, and a top layer of soil. The main objective is to improve soil fertility, reduce soil erosion, improve moisture infiltration and retention, and enable the plantation to withstand the dry months.

Integrated soil fertility management
Cropland
Planting pits for soil fertilisation and moisture improvement
Composting using indigenous microorganisms

By taking advantage of the natural process of decomposition of organic matter by microorganisms, compost is produced from raw materials such as weeds and bio-waste available on the farm. The raw materials are shredded and sprayed with a mixture of one tablespoon of forest soil and one tablespoon of sugar/molasses in one liter of water to hasten decomposition. The purpose is to produce compost to use as fertilizer, which can reduce the input cost of using chemical fertilizer and negative effects to the soil and the environment. Compost is a rich source of organic matter which improves soil quality. Its decomposition slowly releases available nutrients for plant uptake.

Integrated soil fertility management
Cropland
Composting using indigenous microorganisms
Seed priming and microfertlization

Seed priming and microfertilization are two agronomic measures to increase soil fertility and increase crop harvests in semi-arid drylands. Seed priming consists of soaking seeds for 8 hours prior to sowing, and microfertilization is the application of small amounts of mineral fertilizer to the planting hole. Priming will increase water use efficiency and results show that yields can be increased by 50% if microfertilization is combined with seed priming. Seed priming and microfertilization can be practiced independently from each other; however, the combination reduces the risk of crop failure and shows best results in terms of yield increase.

Integrated soil fertility management
Cropland
Seed priming and microfertlization
Manure separation to better distribute organic matter

The primary purpose of manure separation is to produce a thick fraction with high organic matter and nutrient content and low moisture content. Slurry manure is fed through a manure separator that separates much of the thick material from the liquid portion. The thick material is a valuable fertiliser and can be transported over large distances. The thin fraction can be applied as fertiliser on the farm, on farmland in the proximity, or can be treated into a quality suitable for discharge in the environment or water drainage system. Note: For this SLM technology case, the SPI report on Sustainable Land Management and Climate Change refers to: Gebrezgabher, S.A., et al. 2015. Factors influencing adoption of manure separation technology in the Netherlands, Journal of Environmental Management,150 (1).

Integrated soil fertility management
Grazing land
Manure separation to better distribute organic matter