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Regional workshop on UNCCD reporting takes place in Addis Ababa

19-22 March, 2018 – Addis Ababa, Ethiopia – The workshop for Annex I country Parties on the reporting requirements under the new UNCCD 2018-2030 Strategic Framework took place at the UN Economic Commission for Africa (UNECA) Conference Center. The workshop, organized by the UNCCD secretariat and the Global Mechanism in collaboration with UN Environment /GEF, was attended by the delegates from forty four Sub-Saharan African countries. The participants addressed linkages between the UNCCD and the SDG reporting processes, the complementarity between the GSP II and the UN Environment /GEF umbrella projects, data requirements, functionality of the reporting templates and the details of reporting on land-based indicators. The workshop in Addis Ababa was the second in the series of five regional workshops for the UNCCD Annexes. Read more: 2017-2018 reporting process Online reporting tutorials

Regional workshop on UNCCD reporting takes place in Addis Ababa
Asia Pacific capacity building workshop on DLDD monitoring and reporting concludes in New Delhi

27 April, 2018 – New Delhi, India – The four-day UNCCD Asia Pacific regional workshop that focused on building regional capacity and enabling country Parties to participate effectively and efficiently in the UNCCD reporting process, concluded today. The workshop provided a diverse and multi-disciplinary knowledge-sharing platform for addressing desertification, land degradation and drought (DLDD) issues and for reporting on the Target 15.3 on Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN). It also provided an opportunity for all key stakeholders from the region to discuss the crucial aspects of reporting, sustainable development goals (SDGs) and LDN.   In his remarks, Deputy Executive Secretary UNCCD Dr. Pradeep Monga highlighted the importance of addressing DLDD for developing countries and commended India for supporting the convention and putting land agenda at the core of the SDG process. Read more: Statement from the Public Information Bureau of India

Asia Pacific capacity building workshop on DLDD monitoring and reporting concludes in New Delhi
UNCCD, WMO, GWP and FAO meet to discuss The Drought Initiative

25 April, 2018 – Rome, Italy – A meeting at the FAO headquarters brought together representatives of the UNCCD secretariat, FAO and WMO to explore opportunities for collaboration in the framework of the new UNCCD Drought Initiative, adopted at the COP 13 in Ordos, China. The meeting focused on various drought-related tools, programmes and projects implemented by WMO and FAO. The discussion went on to explore areas of potential cooperation by harnessing synergies, identifying joint steps and the way forward.   Present at the meeting were Mr. Robert Stefanski, Chief of the Agricultural Meteorology Division at WMO, Mr. Frederik Pischke, Senior Programme Officer at GWP, FAO experts Mr. Eduardo Mansur, Director of Land and Water Division and Dr. Mark Svoboda (through Skype), Director of National Drought Mitigation Center at the University of Nebraska, USA. UNCCD programme officer for drought Mr. Daniel Tsegai and the Global Mechanism programme coordinator Ms. Camilla Nordheim-Larsen represented the convention. 

UNCCD, WMO, GWP and FAO meet to discuss The Drought Initiative
Solutions for land, soils and food in Africa presented at Heliopolis University in Cairo

25 April, 2018 – Cairo, Egypt – UNCCD Executive Secretary Ms. Monique Barbut attended the conference organized by SEKEM Initiative, Heliopolis University for Sustainable Development and the World Future Council. The goal of the event was not only to raise awareness on exemplary policies for land, soils and food in Africa, but also to create synergies between policymakers of international organizations, as well as national stakeholders – ministries, members of parliament, civil society, academia and media.  The conference welcomed high-level participants and experts on land and soil issues from across the globe. Addressing the gathering, Ms. Barbut emphasized that the path to tackling desertification and accompanying challenges, such as forced migration, lies in a clear vision combined with a concrete plan for action. UNCCD supports countries in fighting land degradation by promoting good land stewardship, based on sound policy and science. UNCCD flagship initiatives, among them Land Degradation Neutrality Target Setting Programme and the 3S (Stability. Sustainability. Security) Initiative, are actively implemented in Africa.  Photo (left to right): Hans Herren, President, Millennium Institute and President, Biovision Foundation; Abdelkarim Sma, Egypt Country Director, International Fund for Agricultural Development, IFAD; Dr. Auma Obama, Councillor, World Future Council and Director of the Sauti Kuu Foundation; Monique Barbut, UN Under Secretary General, UNCCD Executive Secretary; Alexandra Wandel, Director of the World Future Council; Lothar H. Fickert, Professor, Graz University of Technology; Prof. Hani Sewilam, Academic Director, Hydrology Department, RWTH Aachen University. Read more: Conference declaration

Solutions for land, soils and food in Africa presented at Heliopolis University in Cairo
Asia Pacific regional workshop on PRAIS reporting opens in New Delhi

24 April, 2018  – New Delhi, India – Delegates from the states of India, ministerial representatives and the chairman of The Energy and Resource Institute (TERI) participated in the opening session of the UNCCD Asia Pacific regional workshop on PRAIS reporting, chaired by the Minister of Environment, Forests and Climate Change of India Dr. Harsh Vardhan. The Minister highlighted the commitment of the Government of India towards the land agenda and presented several national initiatives related to the implementation of UNCCD. Emphasizing the crucial need to achieve land degradation neutrality (LDN) by 2030, Dr. Vardhan encouraged the delegates to transform the workshop into a milestone in combating desertification, land degradation and drought.  Participants showed strong interest in the Trends.Earth tool developed by Conservation International to assist in the new UNCCD reporting process. Several representatives of country parties shared their own national data and boundary shape files. Attendies raised a broad range of questions on data resolution and the use of national data for land cover data presentation. The parties were informed that they need to make the decision whether they will use the default data provided by the secretariat or utilize their own national data. If parties opt to use the default data, the template will be pre-filled with the necessary information. In this case, Trends.Earth may be used for future work and national data when it becomes available. The workshop will continue until 27 April 2018. Read more: Achieving land degradation neutrality 2017-2018 reporting process Online reporting tutorials  

Asia Pacific regional workshop on PRAIS reporting opens in New Delhi
Zambia’s "Plant a Million Trees" takes root

24 April, 2018 – Lusaka, Zambia (IPS) – Trees are a vital component in the ecosystem –they not only give oxygen, store carbon, stabilize the soil and give refuge to wildlife, but also provide materials for tools, shelter and ultimately, food for both animals and human beings. In fact, according to the World Bank statistics, some 1.3 billion people around the world depend on forests for their livelihood – that is a fifth of the global population. This includes income from the sale of trees and tree-related products. It also includes the value of fruit, fodder, medicines, and other direct or indirect products that they consume. In monetary terms, the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) estimates the annual net benefit of restoring 150 million hectares of land at approximately 85 billion dollars per year. Additionally, it would sequester massive amounts of greenhouse gases. However, it is globally recognized that forest restoration requires an integrated approach which appreciates and understands forests along their entire value chain. Thus, it is crucial to see forest landscape restoration efforts as much more than just protecting forests, but as a force for economic growth and poverty reduction. It is from this background that several game-changing initiatives such as the decade-long United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD)’s Great Green Wall, UN REDD plus strategy for carbon trading, and national governments’ annual tree planting exercises are being implemented to restore the world’s degraded landscapes and in the process transform millions of lives. For Zambia, the forestry sector contributes significantly to household incomes for forest dependent communities, particularly in rural areas. Nationally, according to recent data by the Integrated Land Use Assessment (ILUA) project, the forestry sector contributes 5.5% to GDP. But for a country which boasts 44 million hectares of forests covering 58.7 percent of the total land surface area, 5.5% contribution to GDP is not good enough. And an alarming annual deforestation rate of 276,021 hectares confirms this challenge that require immediate attention. “Growing population and economic pressure has increased demand for economic and social development, forcing people to just take from the environment instead of growing from it,” says Richard Jeffery, a conservation expert. Jeffery believes “Plant A Million” (PAM) initiative could reverse this trend as it is promoting an economic benefit model. What is PAM? “Plant A Million” (PAM) aims to plant at least two billion trees by 2021. According to Emmanuel Chibesakunda, PAM initiator, sponsor and project manager, the vision is to accelerate and scale up a tree-based economy for socio-economic change in Zambia and mitigate climate change impacts. “Plant A Million is a joint public-private tree planting initiative that is promoting a tree-based economy and sustainable development through local school and community participation,” Chibesakunda told IPS. “This initiative focuses on developing the future of Zambia with the full set of skills and know how, through promoting thought leadership and innovation, social responsibility, leadership skills and helping children to connect to the world.” Therefore, he adds, the project has taken a deliberate strategy to entrust the future in the hands of future leaders – children, thus the emphasis on public schools and community participation. Under this strategy, he says, education and attitude change are key project outcomes: “We want to shift away from the focus on number of trees planted as the wrong success factors. Key is how many trees survive the critical first two years, and the value they add to the community. Our focus is attitude change, and it has to start with the future leaders – children.” Children as key players There is a common adage in one of Zambia’s local languages, Bemba, which states: “imiti ikula empanga,” loosely translated as “today’s seedlings are tomorrow’s forests.” In a nutshell, the values being imparted in today’s children will determine the future world view. Roy Lombe, an educator, believes that today’s seedlings have to be well nurtured through a practical hands-on approach. “Our generation has mishandled forests due to poor attitude, and so we don’t want to fall in the same trap,” he says. “Once they learn the value of a tree while young, they will not depart from it when they grow into adults.” Confirming this nurture-analogy, is Maureen Chibenga, a 16-year-old Grade Eleven pupil at Lake Road PTA School. “When the project team came to our school, I did not hesitate to be a champion, as my interest in trees dates back to my early life family values—farming,” Chibenga told IPS. “My grandfather has a farm, my father has a farm, so I saw this as an opportunity to grow my knowledge of trees and their value to humanity.” For 15-year-old Subilo Banda, also in Grade Eleven at the same school, his motivation, he says, is to correct the wrongs of the past. “I think our generation is open-minded. The old generation’s mistakes have taught us what we know. That’s why I think it is a very good idea to start with us in terms of mindset change,” he says, adding that there is a better possibility for his generation to embrace a ‘green’ lifestyle due to this early exposure and education. As an incentive, the schools involved will be earning an income. Chilando Chella, Lake Road PTA School Manager, cannot wait for this exciting opportunity to make extra cash: “We have targeted to raise 50,000 seedlings this year from which we expect to earn thousands of kwacha. And we plan to plough back this money into skills training, for we know that not all of our learners will end up in the formal sector.” So far, the project has already reached out to 12 schools with 15,000 students in Lusaka district, who are growing 500,000 tree seedlings. A further 132 schools are on standby to be included in the program within the next eight months with the target from the vice president to reach 720 schools in all 10 provinces in the next two years involving approximately one million children. Government buy-in With the project announced by Republican Vice President in February 2018 during the National Tree Planting day, almost all ministries are already keyed-in. Strategic among them are the Ministries of National Development Planning (overall coordination), General Education and High Education (Schools, Colleges and Universities), and the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources, which holds the forestry sector portfolio. Professor Nkandu Luo is the Minister of Higher Education. With a considered view that her ministry is the bedrock on which development is anchored, Professor Luo also believes the project is in tandem with, and supports the value system agenda that government is promoting, as espoused in the country’s constitution. “Honesty and hard work are some of the key values that our constitution is promoting, and I think this project is timely in this regard. Teaching our young ones to learn the value of hard work, of honesty and being able to earn based on one’s input and not expecting to earn where one has not sown. So, this project will be used by the Ministry of National Guidance and Religious Affairs to push the value system agenda as advocated in our constitution.” Meanwhile, for the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources, the approach of not looking at plantations but individuals is very important, considering the high deforestation rate that the country is recording. “I am not afraid to mention here, and let me put it on record, that for as long as we do not provide alternative energy solutions for our people, they will continue cutting trees,” laments Jean Kapata, Minister of Lands and Natural Resources. “But I am happy to report that we have started looking at several alternative options one of which is the bamboo for charcoal which we believe will be a game changer if well implemented.” According to Kapata, government is considering scaling up plantations of some fast-growing bamboo species which can be harvested starting at four years and can go on up to fifty years. However, attitude change requires information. And Dora Siliya, Minister of Information and Broadcasting Services, argues for a narrative change regarding the climate change and development discourse. “We have been looking at this climate change issue wrongly, only thinking about how to mitigate, adapt and conserve, we have not thought of what wealth and jobs can be created from this agenda…so it is time we took a different approach as communicators on how to publicise these issues for mindset change, and this ministry is taking a lead on that front.” In terms of scale, PAM is an ambitious project that could change Zambia’s forestry landscape forever. However, with several initiatives undertaken in the past, which have seemingly not achieved the desired results, there is always room for caution. Finnish Ambassador to Zambia Timo Olkkonen provides some guidance to the PAM initiators: “Finland has directly and indirectly contributed to Zambia’s efforts to have sustainably managed forests, over the last 50 years of development cooperation between the two countries. However, some of the projects and programmes have not been hugely successful; it is therefore imperative for you to understand reasons why some of the initiatives of the past have not yielded much results, there are key lessons to be learnt.” As the project awaits its official launch by President Edgar Chagwa Lungu later this month, the children already involved are keen to be key influencers. “I wouldn’t blame charcoal makers for it is a source of livelihood for some of them, but let them learn to plant more than what they cut,” says 15-year-old Mutwiva Upeme, Grade Eleven pupil at Chunga School. “Thank you for letting us get involved—we are the future!” Read the article in French and Spanish on the IPS site. Photo (top): Matero East primary school students collecting water. Credit: Munich Advisors Group

Zambia’s "Plant a Million Trees" takes root