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UN Summer Academy 2018: 2030 Agenda underscores the importance of the UNCCD mandate

Bonn, Germany – The UNCCD Lead Scientist Dr. Barron Joseph Orr presented the work of the convention at the UN Summer Academy 2018, emphasizing that the 2030 Agenda has underscored the importance of the UNCCD mandate and enriched the substance behind it. More than ever, the effort to address land degradation requires collaboration, and it is clear the common vision of the SDGs can help motivate action in a coordinated manner.

 Dr. Orr has reminded the attendees that achieving the SDGs targets is essential for the future, but can also place additional demands on land, often with multiple claims on the same resources. Doing the right thing in the right place at the right scale and working together to optimize mutual outcomes for present and future generations is crucial. Land Degradation Neutrality (SDG target 15.3) provides the framework for policy and appropriate interventions to make this happen. The UN Summer Academy is an engaging five-day programme for UN staff, government representatives, civil society representatives, academics, business representatives and a select number of Master and post-graduate students. It leverages the presence of nineteen UN entities and numerous international development entities in Bonn to foster rich interaction on issues relevant to the work of the UN and its partners in implementing the 2030 Agenda and the Paris Agreement. The academy features panel discussions, solution-oriented workshops, field trips to sustainable development projects and a story fair. Read more: About the convention Land and SDGs Scientific conceptual framework for LDN

UN Summer Academy 2018: 2030 Agenda underscores the importance of the UNCCD mandate
Scaling up land restoration is the path to achieving SDGs

Nairobi, Kenya – Showcasing the success of large-scale restoration of landscapes burdened by natural or man-made disasters, the Global Partnership for Forest and Landscape Restoration (GPFLR) today launched the report "Restoring forests and landscapes, the key to sustainable future." The report, released ahead of the Global Landscapes Forum in Nairobi, presents the results of long-term and large-scale research and outlines several case studies in forest and landscape restoration, highlighting a variety of time-proven opportunities to bring unfertile land back to life. Securing enough healthy and fertile landscapes is key to address land degradation, drought and the steadily increasing number of migrants driven from their homes by land food insecurity or conflict over natural resources, but with 40 per cent of global land cover already allocated for agricultural purposes, room for expansion is limited. Nations around the world recognize the economic benefits that investing in restoration brings, and while the threats posed by degradation are daunting, our growing understanding of how natural systems work present enormous opportunities for positive change. As of 2018, 47 countries, including India, Kenya, Ethiopia, Mexico, and Peru have already committed to bringing more than 160 million hectares – the size of the Indian subcontinent – into restoration by signing on to the world’s largest restoration initiative – the Bonn Challenge. Boosting the momentum generated by the Bonn challenge and ultimately aiming to restore more than two billion hectares of degraded land worldwide, the government of El Salvador, supported by UN Environment, proposed to declare the next ten years "A Decade for Ecosystem Restoration" to promote the rehabilitation of degraded, damaged and destroyed lands.  Read more: Global Landscapes Forum 2018 in Nairobi Download the full report

Scaling up land restoration is the path to achieving SDGs
LAC Climate Week: Linking Paris Agreement and LDN

Montevideo, Uruguay – The UNCCD regional coordination unit for Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC RCU) participated in the  LAC Climate Week organized by the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) on 20– 23 August, 2018. The LAC RCU coordinator Mr. Jose Miguel Torrico took part in the round table of the high-level segment,  titled  "Climate-compatible development: Linking the Paris Agreement and the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable development."
 Mr. Torrico highlighted the goal 15.3 as the implementation tool for the UNCCD, with the focus on achieving land degradation neutrality (LDN) by 2030. He also presented the linkages between the three LDN  indicators (land cover, productivity and carbon stocks) and the objectives of UNFCCC and the role that the nationally determined contributions (NCDs)  can play in achieving LDN.
 The importance of establishing partnerships and joint actions by the LAC countries for the implementation of both conventions has also been discussed, together with the necessity to keep the channels of communication and information exchange open and fluid. A joint regional meeting of focal points representing both conventions to establish  future actions and a coordinated agenda has been proposed as the next step. Read more: Scientific conceptual framework for LDN Synergies between Rio conventions SDG indicator 15.3.1

LAC Climate Week: Linking Paris Agreement and LDN
Governments agree on measures to help migrants fleeing degrading lands

The plight of people migrating in the context of environmental degradation, climate change impacts and natural disasters as well as potential governance responses to such challenges have received a lot of attention in recent years. The finalization of the text of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCM) in July 2018 represents an important milestone for policymakers and practitioners working on environmental migration matters. In the latest installment of the UNCCD science to policy weblog, Mariam Traore Chazalnoël, a specialist in environmental and climate migration at the International Organization for Migration (IOM)’s Office to the United Nations in New York, discusses how the agreement addresses the issues of forced migration linked to desertification, land degradation and drought, as well as the importance of GCM for the UNCCD efforts to promote land restoration and sustainable land management as ways to contribute to the global migration governance. Read more: UNCCD science to policy weblog Global Compact for Migration Land and human security Sustainability, Stability, Security (3S Initiative)

Governments agree on measures to help migrants fleeing degrading lands
WEBLOG: Governments agree on measures to help migrants fleeing degrading lands - Mariam Traore

The plight of people migrating in the context of environmental degradation, climate change impacts and natural disasters and the potential governance responses to such challenges have received a lot of attention in recent years. Therefore, the finalization of the text of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCN) in July 2018 represents an important milestone for many of the policymakers and practitioners working on environmental migration matters. > Read more

WEBLOG: Governments agree on measures to help migrants fleeing degrading lands - Mariam Traore
Governments agree on measures to help migrants fleeing degrading lands

The plight of people migrating in the context of environmental degradation, climate change impacts and natural disasters and the potential governance responses to such challenges have received a lot of attention in recent years. Therefore, the finalization of the text of the Global Compact for Safe, Orderly and Regular Migration (GCN) in July 2018 represents an important milestone for many of the policymakers and practitioners working on environmental migration matters.

Governments agree on measures to help migrants fleeing degrading lands