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NFT event to fund women-led solutions in the Great Green Wall

Women and climate is the focus of a new charitable non-fungible token (NFT) art drop, launched 21 January on the margins of the World Economic Forum’s digital edition of Davos. It will land on the pioneering marketplace SuperRare, featuring digital artwork inspired by the interlinked challenges of gender equality and climate justice.  This carbon-net negative event is a collaboration between the climate tech non-profit Code Green co-founded by  UNCCD Land Ambassador Inna Modja and the World of Women NFT collection that unites female artists to celebrate women’s diversity and power. Inna says she was inspired to create this auction by her experience traveling along the Great Green Wall — an African-led initiative growing an 8000-km green corridor across the continent to improve the lives of millions of women on the frontline of climate change.  "Being from Mali, I have seen with my own eyes that women and girls disproportionately bear the brunt of the global climate emergency. They are the main stewards of natural resources like land, making up 80 per cent of the agricultural workforce. Through absolutely no fault of their own, climate change is destroying their livelihoods and sparking widespread food insecurity, mass migration and conflict. The Great Green Wall is a powerful solution that can help empower women to take charge of their own destinies." — Inna Modja Inna contributed some of her own artwork to the Women and Climate charitable NFT drop that will channel 70 per cent of all proceeds to women-led land restoration solutions along the Great Green Wall. Image: Twin Mamas by Inna Modja Read more: Great Green Wall initiative Land and gender UNCCD Land Ambassadors NFT community supports climate action, sustainably

NFT event to fund women-led solutions in the Great Green Wall
The business case for regenerative land use

Currently, one in every five hectares of land on Earth is unusable and by 2050 only 10% of land could be healthy Businesses are failing to help protect the resources of healthy ecosystems they depend upon such as land for farming The good news is that initiatives like The Great Green Wall are proving that action can be taken now to reverse land degradation By 2050, 90 per cent of land could become degraded. How can businesses help restore the resources they depend upon? Land restoration, with a ballpark cost of $500 per hectare, is one of the most cost-effective ways to combat business risks. Restoring just 350 million hectares of degraded land could, by 2030, remove greenhouse gases roughly equal to half the world’s annual emissions from the atmosphere. Restoring land can earn an extra $1.4 trillion in agricultural production every year. Focusing on regenerative land use is an opportunity to safeguard businesses from the impacts of climate change and land degradation. Restoring ecosystems and soil biodiversity is among the most effective weapons against weather extremes. Restoring land can create employment and help a green recovery from the COVID-19 pandemic. In the US, first movers have demonstrated that under certain conditions, farms with regenerative practices are an estimated 78% more profitable than those using conventional practices. Read the latest blog by the UNCCD Executive Secretary Mr. Ibrahim Thiaw for the World Economic Forum: https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2022/01/how-businesses-can-help-restore-land-resources/ Read more: The Great Green Wall initiative Achieving Land Degradation Neutrality UNCCD science-policy blog

The business case for regenerative land use
Poverty, economics and climate change: virtual panel discussion

What are the true consequences of poverty and climate change? What are the economics behind both? What is the UNCCD’s role in addressing these problems in the wake of COVID19 pandemic?   These topics with be discussed by a virtual panel hosted by UNCCD Capacity Development and Innovations Office, featuring the following experts: Ibrahim Thiaw – UNCCD Executive Secretary Yanis Varoufakis – economist, professor and prominent politician  Dr. Olivier de Schutter – UN Special Representative for Extreme Poverty Ahmed Aziz Diallo – member of the Inter-Parliamentary Union – United Nations Affairs Commission  Jann Lay – head of research programme "Growth and Development" 5 June World Environment Day 2020 Berlin 2:00 pm (UTC+2) Beijing 8:00 pm (CEST) New Delhi 5:30 pm (IST) New York 8:00 am (EDT) We seek your active participation – register here {"preview_thumbnail":"/sites/default/files/styles/video_embed_wysiwyg_preview/public/video_thumbnails/gDhHOTQjwKA.jpg?itok=dYeLeTeV","video_url":"https://youtu.be/gDhHOTQjwKA","displayed_as_thumbnail":0,"image_style":"","settings":{"responsive":1,"width":"854","height":"480","autoplay":1},"settings_summary":["Embedded Video (Responsive, autoplaying).",[]]}

Poverty, economics and climate change: virtual panel discussion
Chefs advocating for a change in our food systems to improve soil health

The  new installment of the UNCCD Science-Policy blog presents Chefs' Manifesto: a network of 700 chefs from 70 countries who are championing a better food future, inspiring people to make changes in their kitchens and communities and empowering them to call on governments and companies to play their part on the topics that chefs are most passionate about. The blog focuses on links between consumption and land, highlighting the importance of soil health, reduced food waste and under-utilized ingredients. It also features the work of chefs who go above and beyond to transform the health of our soil, the planet and the people, mobilizing stakeholders to coordinate global campaigns and advocacy to achieve Sustainable Development Goal 2: Zero Hunger.  Read more:  UNCCD Science-Policy weblog Desertification and Drought Day 2020 Short film series for Desertification and Drought Day 2020 Land and Sustainable Development Goals

Chefs advocating for a change in our food systems to improve soil health
Chefs advocating for a change in our food systems to improve soil health

When populations experience economic growth, their appetite for more food and more resource intensive food grows. While this is welcomed in many parts of the world in which communities suffer malnutrition and hunger, the gap between the haves and have nots is growing. The Chefs’ Manifesto is championing a better food future, inspiring people to make changes in their kitchens and communities and empowering them to call on governments and companies to play their part.

Chefs advocating for a change in our food systems to improve soil health