This block type should be used in "unccd one column" section with "Full width" option enabled

News & stories

news
Latest News & Stories

Keyword

Filter by

Date

Tags

Topics

Year

Nominations for prestigious UN Award Open 

Nominations for the 2021 Land for Life Award of the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) opened today. The submission of nominees will close after two months, on 28 January 2021.    The Award recognizes initiatives to halt, reduce and/or reverse land degradation that have had a positive impact on people and their land by using a holistic approach as well as practices that address both the environmental and social aspects of land management.   Under the theme “Healthy Land, Healthy Lives,” the 2021 Award will spotlight changemakers doing innovative land restoration and conservation that is both promoting the well-being of communities and improving their relationship with nature. It will reflect land as part of the solution, as the communities around the world recover from the COVID-19 pandemic and build back better around a social contract for nature.    Winners will be invited to present their projects and work at international forums, including the Kubuqi International Desertification Forum in China, where the Award Ceremony will take place in mid-2021, and at the Fifteenth session of the Conference of the Parties to the Convention at the end of 2021.   These forums offer winners special access to potential new funding partners and stakeholders.    Previous winners include World Vision (Australia), SEKEM (Egypt), Watershed Organization Trust (India) and Réseau MARP (Burkina Faso).   By winning the prestigious award, some have expanded their projects, secured new partnerships or been recognized by other international and national awards.  Mr. Tony Rinaudo, World Vision Australia, said “The Land for Life Award has played a significant role in lifting the profile of a relatively obscure intervention – Farmer Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) globally, giving it wider visibility and validating it as an effective tool in land and tree restoration. […] Today, FMNR is a normal part of the development lexicon when it comes to land restoration approaches and is considered a ‘best practice’ by many donors and development practitioners alike.”  “So much has awareness grown that the flagship intervention being promoted by the Global Evergreening Alliance, a coalition of NGOs, conservation groups, research institutions and professionals – is FMNR. In the seven years since World Vision was granted the Land for Life Award, the practice of FMNR, and individuals promoting it, have gone onto win other nationally and internationally significant awards,” Mr Rinaudo said.  ”In our quest to establish a new social contract for nature and ensure a healthier and safer future for all, we need to promote the connection between people and their environment, on the one hand, and focus on innovative approaches that involve communities, empower women and promote new technologies on the other. In these uncertain times where a growing number of infectious diseases is coming through land use change, we are searching for positive and inspiring models that are creating healthy lives by turning degrading land into healthy land,” says Ibrahim Thiaw, Executive Secretary of the UNCCD.    The Land for Life Award also has a special China Award that celebrates exceptional commitment to sustainable land management in China.     Elion Foundation  is the main sponsor of the Land for Life Programme, but leads the special China Award together with the National Forestry and Grassland Administration, Ministry of Science and Technology, and Provincial Governmental of the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region.     Notes to Editors    For further information regarding the rules and criteria, visit the Land for Life Award webpage.    Contact: Land for Life programme: L4L@unccd.int   Additional Quotes from Previous Winners:  Ms. Marcella D’Souza, WOTR Centre for Resilience Studies (W-CReS):  "The L4L Award helped us connect and engage with the ELD Secretariat at the GIZ based out of Bonn, who we had met at Kubuqi. This resulted in a new project on Economic Valuation of regenerating degraded lands through Watershed Development, implemented by our research unit – the WOTR Centre for Resilience Studies (W-CReS). In addition, the Award and the exposure it provided us helped transition our watershed-focussed interventions to a more holistic ecosystems-based approach targeted at building adaptive capacities and resilience of rural communities to climate and non-climate risks. This led to another partnership and project with the ambition to develop a state level "Roadmap for Ecosystems-based Adaptation" which involves multi-stakeholder and multi-sectoral engagement and collaboration across scales."  Mr. Mathieu Ouédraogo, Réseau MARP: “Winning the Land for Life Award is certainly a great honor, but above all a major opportunity. This distinction led the communities we work with to be more thorough in the actions they carry out daily, focusing on tangible results. Quantitatively, we have doubled our objective in terms of achievements in the field, thanks to the worldwide recognition of our efforts.”  Mr. Awadalla Hamid, Practical Action Sudan: “The award has definitely a great impact on the project and the life of the people of Darfur, as we managed to secure an additional fund for a second phase of the same project, 10M Euros from the European Union to support more families in Wadi ElKu project area, and to cover additional 180km along the Wadi ElKu Catchment in North Darfur.”  About the UNCCD  The United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) is an international agreement on good land stewardship. Through partnerships, the Convention’s 197 Parties set up robust systems to manage land degradation and drought promptly and effectively. Good land stewardship based on a sound policy and science helps integrate and accelerate the achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals, builds resilience to climate change and prevents biodiversity loss. Land also plays a key role in the prevention, preparedness, response, and recovery phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, securing rural livelihoods and creating green jobs, supporting community resilience and maintaining the sustainable delivery of ecosystem services.   

Nominations for prestigious UN Award Open 
Healthy Land, Healthy Lives: Nominate a project for the 2021 Land for Life Award! 

The UNCCD Land for Life Award is back! We are looking for outstanding commitments and creative approaches to combat desertification and drought. Our award goes beyond raising awareness on the issues of land degradation and deforestation. We also want to give YOU the opportunity to introduce to the world the stories and projects of changemakers around the globe who help create a healthier and more sustainable future!  The scientists who address the origins and the effects of the ongoing COVID-19 confirm that healthy land is essential to human health, well-being and resilience. This year’s L4L Award seeks to reward the land users whose conservation work is protecting the vital connection between humanity and the environment! Do you have a success story that deserves recognition for promoting a new social contract for nature and supports the principle of Healthy Land, Healthy Lives? Visit the L4L Award page for more information and send us your submission by 14 February 2021. Read more: Official press release Land for Life award webpage

Healthy Land, Healthy Lives: Nominate a project for the 2021 Land for Life Award! 
G20 announces new initiative to save degrading land

Statement of UNCCD Executive Secretary Ibrahim Thiaw on the Global Initiative on Reducing Land Degradation and Enhancing Conservation of Terrestrial Habitats The world’s 20 most powerful economies have launched an initiative to protect land. The Leaders’ Declaration issued Sunday, 22 November 2020, states that the G-20 leaders launched "the Global Initiative on Reducing Land Degradation and Enhancing Conservation of Terrestrial Habitats to prevent, halt, and reverse land degradation. Building on existing initiatives, we share the ambition to achieve a 50 percent reduction of degraded land by 2040, on a voluntary basis.” The G-20 initiative shows an unprecedented resolve by the world’s largest economies to conserve the terrestrial environment, and is expected to focus on capacity building, engaging the private sector and civil society and showcasing success.  Speaking at the event, Antonió Guterres, Secretary General of the United Nations, said the international community “is borrowing trillions of dollars from future generations for COVID-19 recovery.” Emphasising a “moral obligation” on the international community to ensure young people are not “burdened by a mountain of debt on a broken planet,” he said “the recovery must help to reconcile humankind and nature on all fronts. From climate to biodiversity, from protecting the oceans to stopping deforestation and land degradation.”  Indeed, we have one shot – this decade and no more – to save our lands. A  study of all the global initiatives to restore degrading land released earlier this month shows that close to one billion of the two billion hectares of land that is degraded can be restored. This initiative by G-20 leaders is a signal that the time to invest in protecting and restoring the land is now.   Read more: G20 Riyadh Summit Leaders Declaration

G20 announces new initiative to save degrading land
German Advisory Council report: a welcome boost to protect and restore the land

By UNCCD Executive Secretary Mr. Ibrahim Thiaw The German Advisory Council on Global Change’s recent report, Rethinking Land in the Anthropocene: from Separation to Integration, makes it abundantly clear that we need a fundamental change in how we manage the land to limit climate change, reverse biodiversity loss and create sustainable food systems. The five strategies illustrated in this report – ecosystem restoration, expanding and upgrading protected areas, diversifying farming systems, transforming diets and shaping the bioeconomy responsibly – are very much in line with the UNCCD’s efforts to better manage the land. Transforming lives and livelihoods Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN), in particular, is a key goal. LDN is an international commitment (SDG Target 15.3) under which countries work together to stop, prevent and reverse the loss of productive land. The total restoration commitments in place are close to one billion hectares, almost half of which are in Sub-Saharan Africa.  The upcoming UN Decade on Ecosystem Restoration gives us further opportunities to push hard on this agenda.  We already see action in Africa, through the Great Green Wall Initiative. By restoring 100 million hectares of degraded land, the initiative is boosting food security and livelihoods. To date, 350,000 jobs and around USD 90 million in revenues have been generated. Such efforts bring back biodiversity, reduce the effects of climate change and make communities more resilient. All told, the benefits outweigh the costs ten-fold.  Producing and consuming sustainably I also welcome the recognition of the need to reform diets, which was the focus of Drought and Desertification Day 2020. In our globalized world, the food we eat impacts land thousands of miles away. Each of us holds the power to protect the land by making different choices in our daily lives. The food we lose or waste each year uses almost 30 per cent of the world’s agricultural land area, while the land used to graze and produce grain to feed animals makes up 80 per cent of agricultural land. We must all look at shifting to a more balanced diet. Advancing a people-focused approach  The Council’s recommendation to support change agents who pioneer new practices for managing and using land sustainably is also critical. A people-focused approach to land restoration is at the core of the UNCCD’s mandate to fight land degradation and desertification and mitigate the effects of drought. Progress in land tenure to provide secure equitable land rights is a necessary condition for better land stewardship, achieving gender equality and bringing innovation into the land use sector.  We at the UNCCD know that our survival and future prosperity depends on the land. Healthy land is finite, but changes in consumer and corporate behaviors, combined with better land use planning and management, can help meet the demand for essential goods and services without compromising land resources. These changes can greater cleaner, greener, healthier, safer and more resilient societies as we recover from the COVID-19 pandemic. This report summary presents a clear path toward climate change mitigation, ecosystem protection and food systems sustainability through better land management. I thank the WBGU for galvanizing support and action toward a new social contract for nature.   

German Advisory Council report: a welcome boost to protect and restore the land
UNCCD ES statement at the Land Jobs for Youth webinar

Madame la Première ministre du Togo,   Chers panélistes,   Chers participants,    La question de savoir comment créer de la richesse pour les jeunes à partir de la terre peut paraître surprenante.     Prenons le cas de l’alimentation. La terre nourrit 7 milliards d’êtres humains. Aussi, si vous n’avez consommé aucun produit animal ou végétal provenant de la terre au cours des dernières 24 heures, c’est probablement parce que vous n’avez rien trouvé à manger...     Point besoin de réfléchir longtemps avant de pouvoir conclure que tant que nous mangeons, nous produirons des emplois et des activités économiques génératrices de revenus basés sur l’agriculture. Un business model qui continue de faire ses preuves. Nos vêtements proviennent de la terre. Nos poissons d’eau douce, notre viande et nos produits laitiers aussi.     Le secteur primaire est la première source de revenus au monde. Pour la grande majorité, c’est la seule source de revenus.     Nul besoin non plus de faire des calculs savants pour comprendre que la croissance démographique entraine plus de bouches à nourrir. Nous serons près de 10 milliards d’ici 2050. Les régions du monde qui seront des vecteurs de cette croissance sont l’Asie et l’Afrique.     Pour mieux comprendre les enjeux, ajoutons que cette croissance s’accompagnera également d’un élargissement d’une classe moyenne au pouvoir d’achat en augmentation.      Par ailleurs, le changement des modes de consommations entrainera une demande exponentielle en produits alimentaires, vestimentaires, en énergie, et en eau. C’est dire que ce business continuera à être florissant.      La vraie question est donc la suivante : s’il y a autant de business offerts par la nature, comment assurer une distribution des revenus qui bénéficie au maximum de personnes ?     Notamment les petits producteurs.     Selon le Forum économique mondial, investir dans une économie favorable à la protection de la nature peut générer USD 10 trillions par an et 395 millions d’emplois d’ici 2030.     A propos des emplois, précisons qu’il s’agit ici moins d’employer des salariés que d’opportunités d’entreprenariat. Notamment pour les jeunes.     La terre nourrit les peuples. C’est un bon business.     Ces opportunités existent aussi bien dans les pays développés que dans ceux à revenus modestes, y compris en Afrique. Le Togo va partager son expérience par la voix de la Première ministre. D’autres exemples seront également partagés par les autres membres du panel.     J’aimerais pour ma part présenter quelques exemples d’à travers le monde, avant de conclure avec quelques pistes de réflexions :     Au Pakistan : « Le Tsunami d’un milliard d’arbres » est un programme officiel du Premier ministre Imran Khan: Le Pakistan indique que non seulement 600 000 hectares de terres dégradées ont pu être restaurés, mais qu’un demi-million d’emplois ont en outre été créés.   Au Sierra Leone : 10 000 emplois créés pour les jeunes en milieu rural, en plantant 1,2 millions d’arbres.   En Namibie : 2 frères, plutôt jeunes, ont créé en 1986 un petit business, sous forme de ranch animalier. Cette activité a généré d’excellentes activités touristiques en 2008. La réserve naturelle de 70 hectares a été mise en vente l’année dernière. Sa valeur a été évaluée à USD 108 million.     Les exemples sont nombreux : en Asie, en Amérique Latine, en Europe, etc. Preuve s’il en est que la conservation de la nature est une activité rentable.     D’ailleurs, des économistes du World Resources Institute ont estimé que chaque dollar investi dans la terre, génère entre 7 et 13 dollars.     Avec de tels taux, pourquoi donc les investisseurs n’ont pas sauté en masse sur ces opportunités ?     Quels sont les goulots d’étranglement et comment transformer ces défis en opportunités ?    Premièrement, il s’agira de repenser nos stratégies de développement. Deux paramètres en particulier méritent d’être réexaminés. D’une part, les politiques foncières et les facilités fiscales et financières. D’autre part, les incubateurs pour les start-ups. L’Afrique, en particulier, ne manque pas de jeunes, dynamiques, prêts à prendre des risques et à s’approprier les nouvelles technologies si on leur en donne les moyens.    Deuxièmement, il s’agira d’encourager les investissements du secteur privé sur la base de partenariats gagnant-gagnant. Les terres en friches et les zones humides sont généralement enregistrées comme des terres domaniales. Or l’Etat n’est pas toujours en mesure d’assurer une bonne gestion de ces ressources, qui au fil du temps, se dégradent. Des forêts classées et autres réserves naturelles ne portent plus que leurs noms d’antan. En favorisant des approches de type partenariat public-privé qui ont déjà fait leurs preuves, nombre de zones touristiques, de forêts, d’espaces péri-urbains pourraient être mises être mise en valeur et générer des revenus.  Combien d’emplois seraient ainsi créés, tout en sauvegardant les milieux naturels et en créant de la richesse ?     Troisièmement, à l’heure de la quatrième révolution industrielle, il s’agira de favoriser l’usage des nouvelles technologies. Le carburant nécessaire à leur décollage économique proviendra d’abord et avant tout du secteur primaire. Il faudra pour cela mettre l’accent sur les investissements d’appuis aux petits producteurs. D’ailleurs, plusieurs pays développés se sont appuyés sur leurs petites et moyennes entreprises pour entamer leur décollage économique. L’industrialisation s’en est suivie.    Les opportunités de créer des partenariats publics-privés sont nombreuses. Elles appellent parfois à une réévaluation des systèmes de gouvernance, y compris une meilleure transparence dans la gestion des biens publics et un système judiciaire indépendant. Condition sine qua non pour attirer les investissements et créer un environnement propice à l’emploi et à une croissance économique inclusive.      Avec l’Accord de Paris sur le climat, plusieurs investisseurs veulent se retirer du secteur des industries polluantes, décriées par tout le monde. L’investissement dans la restauration des terres serait non seulement du business, mais du business propre, utile et intelligent. Il créerait des emplois verts et contribuerait également à résoudre à la fois les problèmes liés aux changements climatiques mais aussi à la perte de biodiversité. C’est aussi l’une des solutions les plus appropriées pour reconstruire les économies si durement bouleversées par la pandémie de la COVID-19.     Les engagements pris par les Etats dans le cadre de UNCCD représentent 450 millions d’hectares à restaurer. Le plus remarquable de tous ces engagements est celui des onze pays de la Grande muraille verte du Sahel visant à restaurer 100 millions d’hectares, créant au passage 10 millions d’emplois d’ici 2030.     Loin d’être uniquement un programme de reboisement, la Grande muraille verte vise à créer une autre économie rurale, à réduire les risques de déficit alimentaire, et à fournir l’énergie solaire aux producteurs. Restaurer les terres, c’est aussi reconstruire l’économie rurale !   La Grande muraille verte contribue aussi indirectement à réduire les pertes de nourriture en conservant les aliments (grâce à l’énergie) et en transformant la production sur place, au lieu de continuer à exporter des produits bruts. D’autres opportunités de création d’emplois.     Au-delà des activités régénératrices du milieu naturel, la Grande muraille verte c’est aussi de vastes chantiers d’installation de centrales d’énergie solaire. C’est la construction d’installations frigorifiques. C’est l’éclairage des centres médicaux et la création de chaînes de froid pour les aliments et les produits médicaux, tels les vaccins.  Le business model qu’offre la Grande muraille verte s’applique bien entendu à d’autres pays, à travers le monde.     La question de savoir comment créer de la richesse pour les jeunes à partir de la terre est à notre portée. Il s’agit de « transformer les défis en opportunités ». Et pour qui ne manque point de terres, d’eau, de soleil, de ressources humaines (jeunes et dynamiques) et de volonté politique, on peut transformer la terre en or !     La lutte contre la pauvreté restera une chimère politique, aussi longtemps que les plus pauvres n’auront pu valoriser ce qu’ils ont de plus cher : la terre.  Je vous remercie.  

UNCCD ES statement at the Land Jobs for Youth webinar
Drive home a global green recovery in 2021 — no excuses

By UNCCD Executive Secretary Ibrahim Thiaw for devex.com This year, the world marked the 75th anniversary of the United Nations in the midst of global calamity and uncertainty of an unprecedented scale. Yet we were also reminded that throughout history, great crises give rise to extraordinary opportunities. The COVID-19 pandemic is the crisis of our time. It has extinguished over 1 million lives in nine months and triggered the deepest economic recession since World War II. Yet this tragedy offers a pathway to a new, more promising future. If we commit to building back better and more sustainably. Read more...  Image: (c) MaveWaves

Drive home a global green recovery in 2021 — no excuses