eWorkshop: Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration in the community

Tony Rinaudo
Events

COVID-19 recovery that builds back better needs to take into account equipping families and communities to be self-sufficient, meeting their daily needs as much as possible from their immediate environment, no matter what the economic circumstances their country is going through. Farmer-Managed Natural Regeneration (FMNR) is a sustainable land managed technique developed and popularized by the Land 4 Life Award winner Tony Rinaudo. Adoption of FMNR and the changed behaviors that accompany it, is a low-cost, rapid and scalable way to better ensure that happens.
 
Who is it for?

  • Field-based staff who are working directly with communities to promote and roll-out FMNR – either in a current or future project
  • Existing FMNR practitioners who what to share their experiences, further extend their knowledge and connect with a global community of peers.
  • Managers or technical advisors who want to familiarise themselves more deeply with FMNR 

What will I learn?

Journey with a global group of peers and expert facilitators to learn how to promote and support FMNR adoption in your local community. The eWorkshop will include: 

  • Planning for FMNR roll-out in a community 
  • Sensitisation meetings and creating spaces for the community to discuss the impact the environment has on their well-being 
  • Understanding the physical FMNR practice and tips for teaching it 
  • Identifying and selecting FMNR champions 
  • Building relationships and ensuring FMNR is inclusive 
  • Troubleshooting when FMNR isn’t going well 
  • Where to find more FMNR information

Time commitment

  • 15 weeks, including a 4-week break for field work ( September 2 – December 8,2020)
  • 3-4 hours work per course week

Registration process

  • World Vision staff and implementing partners register here
  • Self sponsored partners register here
  • Registration deadline: August 15, 2020

Cost

  • A special rate of $500 ($200 savings)

More info

FMNR resources