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Graduate students visit UNCCD to discuss the sustainable future of land

At the start of the new academic year, the United Nations Regional Information Centre in Bonn together with UNCCD, hosted a group of graduate students from Côte d’Ivoire, Germany and Kenya to discuss the Convention’s work on combating drought and desertification and the role of science in supporting good land stewardship. Two dozen students who visited UN Bonn are a part of the programme launched by the German Center for Development Research (ZEF) in 2021, together with the Universities of Cologne, Abidjan and Nairobi as part of the new DAAD Global Environment and Climate Center Initiative. The African Climate and Environment Center – Future African Savannas (AFAS), research programme focuses on nature-based solutions for climate change adaptation and biodiversity conservation in African savannas. Addressing the students, UNCCD Lead Scientist Dr. Barron Joseph Orr stressed the urgency of bringing degraded lands back to health at a time when humanity has already exceeded four of the nine planetary boundaries which define our “safe operating space” – climate change, biodiversity loss, land use change and geochemical cycles, according to the recently published 2nd edition of UNCCD Global Land Outlook. Integrated land use planning that helps anticipate potential land degradation, navigate trade-offs and deliver on multiple Sustainable Development Goals is at the core of the Land Degradation Neutrality (LDN) concept. Developed by the UNCCD Science-Policy Interface (SPI), it provides a strong scientific foundation that supports UNCCD Parties’ work in land restoration. UNCCD Knowledge Management Officer Mr. Jeroen van Dalen explained the structure of the SPI that brings together scientists from various regions, policy makers, practitioners and civil society leaders to research a specific topic such as LDN and provide informed policy recommendations for the country Parties of the convention. Some of the visiting students who come from farming communities in Africa have witnessed firsthand the devastating effects of drought and land degradation on the rangelands and their inhabitants. Many questions from the students have been focused on UNCCD support for land restoration initiatives that benefit local communities. The students also wanted to know how youth can be engaged in UNCCD’s work. The UNCCD Communications Chief Ms. Xenya Scanlon highlighted the Convention’s work with Land Heroes and other young activists, as well as youth-led  civil society organizations, inviting the students to get involved in the UNCCD Youth Caucus.

Graduate students visit UNCCD to discuss the sustainable future of land
Help us grow, join the UNCCD Youth Caucus!

The Global Youth Caucus on Desertification and Land is inviting new membership applications. The UNCCD Youth Caucus is a formal mechanism for youth engagement, set up under the Convention to facilitate the active involvement of children and young people in the UNCCD activities and processes that address desertification, land degradation, drought, sustainable development and climate change. Learn more about our work and help us grow – submit your application using this link.

Help us grow, join the UNCCD Youth Caucus!
UNCCD celebrates World Soil Day 2021 with children's e-book

This World Soil Day, UNCCD invites you to enjoy the Kids4Land e-book. It is a collection of entries from our recent art competition, where we have invited children from all over the world to share with us their vision of the land they would like to live on in the future. Together with their artwork, the kids also shared some profound messages. Beyond reminding us that we don't inherit our land from our ancestors but rather borrow them from our children, the kids have demonstrated that they ready to care for the future of their planet. "I tried to show what I’d like my future land to look like: a peaceful and united place, with humans and animals living on the land free of pollution and full of natural beauty and resources."" — Shoma from Bangladesh I want the land of the future to be beautiful. There's no drought because it rains everywhere, even in the desert. The rain brings out colorful rainbows, lots of water on the land and plenty of fish. And every child grows healthy and happy." — Hu Qingqing from Singapore "Nature is the most important thing, we have to look after it, we are nature too. We mustn’t forget that our countryside and animals are under threat from pesticides and climate change, we have to care for every part of the planet." — Benjamin Fallow from the UK Together with the German cartoonist Özi, we went through all the pictures and selected the 30 best, representing every region of the world. The finalists were invited to participate in an online master class on how to draw better. UNCCD also sent gifts and a certificate to recognize the top six submissions. Learn more: Download the e-book View the competition album on Flickr

UNCCD celebrates World Soil Day 2021 with children's e-book
Using NFTs to support climate action

As the COP26 closes with a call for more ambitious and measurable climate actions by governments, activists around the world are ramping up their efforts to continue work outside the conference halls. Our Land Ambassador, a Malian-French singer and songwriter Inna Modja, in her recent interview with CNN presented the CodeGreen, a new coalition of artists and coders who want to use non-fungible token (NFT) auctions to raise money for climate projects. Inna, who is a co-founder of CodeGreen, discussed its potential to mobilize funds for projects along the Great Green Wall. In the Sahel, where 80 per cent of the population rely on agriculture for their livelihood, the Great Green Wall goes beyond growing trees to create opportunities for vulnerable populations, especially, for youth and women. The first CodeGreen is  planned for the World Economic Forum in Davos. Watch the interview here

Using NFTs to support climate action